Author Lunch – A Novel Plan: The Art of Outlining Your Fiction

Author Lunch, Mechanics Institute Library
Friday, August 16, 2019, 12:00 Noon
57 Post Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 
4th Floor, Chess Room (Free to Public, refreshments available)

 

What are the secrets to success for novels? At least one of them is structure and our esteemed WNBA-SF member authors will share the approaches that have garnered them bestseller status, awards and rave reviews. Learn what role planning and research play and how to make your scenes, settings, and characters realistic and compulsively readable from beginning to end. The Women’s National Book Association’s San Francisco Chapter is thrilled to present three examplar writers for in-depth explanations of the strategies that inform their craft.

A Novel Plan will be moderated by WNBA-SF President Brenda Knight. There will be Q&A followed by book signings; bring your notebooks and plenty of questions!

Sheryl J. Bize-Boutte is an Oakland multidisciplinary writer whose works artfully succeed in getting across deeper meanings about life and the politics of race and economics without breaking out of the narrative, with Oakland often serving as the backdrop for her touching and often hilarious works. Her first book, A Dollar Five-Stories From A Baby Boomer’s Ongoing Journey (2014) has been described as “ rich in vivid imagery”, and “incredible.” Her second book, All That and More’s Wedding (2016), a collection of fictional mystery/crime short stories, is praised as “imaginative with colorful and likeable characters that draw you in to each story and leave you wanting more.”  Her latest book, Running for the 2:10 (2017), a follow-on to A Dollar Five, delves deeper into her coming of age in Oakland and the embedded issues of race and skin color with one reviewer calling it “… a great contribution to literature.” Her fictional story, “Uncle Martin” will be published by Medusa’s Laugh Press Summer 2019. She currently has a novel in progress titled “Betrayal on the Bayou,” slated for publication in early 2020. She is also a contributor to award winning author Kate Farrell’s upcoming book “Story Power,” an anthology on how writers build and create their stories.

Mary Mackey

Mary Mackey is The New York Times bestselling author of fourteen novels, including The Earthsong Series—four novels which describe how the peaceful Goddess-worshiping people of Prehistoric Europe fought off patriarchal nomad invaders (The Village of Bones, The Year The Horses Came, The Horses at the Gate, and The Fires of Spring). Mary’s novels have been praised by Marion Zimmer Bradley, Pat Conroy, Thomas Moore, Marija Gimbutas, Maxine Hong Kingston, Marge Piercy, and Theodore Roszak for their historical accuracy, inventiveness, literary grace, vividness, and storytelling magic. They have made The New York Times and San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller Lists, been translated into twelve foreign languages and sold over a million and a half copies. Mary has also written eight collections of poetry including The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams: New and Selected Poems 1974 to 2018, winner of the 2019 Eric Hoffer Award for Best Book Published by a Small Press and a 2018 CIIS Women’s Spirituality Book Award. An earlier collection of Mary’s poetry, Sugar Zone, won the 2012 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award for Literary Excellence. At marymackey.com, you can get the latest news about Mary’s books and public appearances, sample her work, sign up for her newsletter, and get writing advice. You can also find her on Facebook and follow her on Twitter @MMackeyAuthor.

Martha Conway’s latest novel, The Underground River, was selected as a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice. She is also the author of Thieving Forest, which won the North American Book Award in Historical Fiction, and Sugarland, which was named one of Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2016. Martha’s short fiction has appeared in the Iowa Review, Mississippi Review, The Quarterly, Carolina Quarterly, and other publications. She has reviewed fiction for the San Francisco Chronicle and the Iowa Review, and is a recipient of a California Arts Council fellowship in Creative Writing. In addition to writing, Martha is an instructor of creative writing at Stanford University’s Continuing Studies Program and UC Berkeley Extension. She received her BA from Vassar College in History and English, and her MA in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University. Born and raised in Ohio, she now lives in San Francisco with her family, where the fog reminds her of lake-effect cloud cover in Cleveland. Martha tweets ten-minute prompts every weekday on twitter (#10minprompt) via @marthamconway.

Featured Member Interview – Joan Gelfand

Interview by Susan Allison

What inspires me most about WNBA featured writer Joan Gelfand is her tenacity, her willingness to do whatever it takes to be a successful author. Her honesty is refreshing when she says, “I became determined to get a book out-and it takes determination! My publishing experience has been that every book has taken tremendous effort.”

This effort actually began at the age of eight when she enjoyed reading and writing school-book-reports, and was writing poetry by the age of fifteen. As a young writer, she most admired the styles of Collette and Simone de Beauvoir. As an adult, she credits ee cummings, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Yoko Ono for inspiring her. More recently, novelists such as Richard Powers, Michael Chabon and Zadie Smith have influenced her style. Joan has also studied with Kathleen Fraser and later with Chana Bloch and Sandy Boucher, and says of her mentors, “They were patient, compassionate teachers who encouraged me to keep going.”

Joan began as a poet “submitting massive amounts of work to journals and online magazines, and then to contests.” Her hard work paid off and she now has published three full-length poetry collections with small presses. Currently, she has published five books, including the three poetry collections, an award winning chapbook of short fiction, and her newest book, You Can Be a Winning Writer: the 4 C’s of Successful Authors: Craft, Commitment, Community and Confidence. This work was published by Mango Press in July and hit #1 on the Amazon best sellers list. Joan is excited about her latest novel, Fear to Shred, set in a Silicon Valley startup, which will be published in the fall.

Joan is very frank about the publishing world, “Most publishers require that you already have a history of publication. Just to get a list of publications takes a long while. Fortunately, I have met or was connected to five of my six publishers through people I met at the WNBA!”  She adds that there are two proven paths to becoming a successful author: a writer’s resume of publication credits and getting hundreds of thousands of followers on social media. To build a resume, Joan says to start small by submitting to online journals and lit magazines and eventually to nationally known publishers. Joan believes that building up a resume is the more reliable way to go, but “some people get lucky” on social media.

Joan has followed her own advice and has been rewarded as the recipient of numerous nominations and honors. Her work appears in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Rattle, Prairie Schooner, Kaliope, The Meridian Anthology of Contemporary Poetry, the Toronto Review, Marsh Hawk Review, Levure Litteraire, Chicken Soup for the Soul and many literary magazines and journals.

Currently, Joan is working on another poetry collection and a memoir, and of course, looking forward to her novel being published later this year.

You can contact Joan or receive coaching here:

@joangelfand – twitter

http://joangelfand.com

joangelfand – Facebook

joangelfand – Instagram

Tapping the creative current

An extract from Heart, Sass & Soul: Journal Your Way to Inspiration and Happiness

by Greta Solomon

When I run workshops and online programmes, I always ask the participants why they’ve come and what they want to get out of the workshop or programme. The answers ALWAYS involve blocks or fears. Here are some of the responses I’ve heard:

  • “I work in communications for a management consultancy. I write articles and do a lot of ghostwriting for people in the company. I feel that my own voice is becoming lost. I’m trying to write a novel and want to start a blog. But I haven’t got a clue about what I would blog about.
  • “Most of my career has revolved around writing, but mostly other people’s writing–editing and translating their work so they can get published. I finally want to prioritise MY work.”
  • “I have been writing professionally for about 10 years, mostly journalism, plus two non-fiction books. I would love to explore a more creative way of writing. This is something I have wanted for a long time but simply haven’t ‘allowed’ myself the time to do.”
  • “When it comes to my writing, I feel like a washed-up actor, as though my best work behind me.”
  • “I’ve spent so much time and energy raising my kids that I need to do something for myself. I want to be the writer I know I can be–before it’s too late.”

Do you recognise any of these responses in yourself?
Knowing what you want and your intentions before you start writing is super powerful. It helps you to anchor your writing, because you’re clear on exactly which blocks, or behaviour patterns you want to break through.
For all my clients, writing is such an intricate part of their lives. Most have a longing to make their writing more formal. They feel a need to put a stake in the ground and accept that their thoughts and feelings deserve to be put in writing. Yet, their fears and negative emotions are getting in the way. There’s a push-and-pull between wanting to share and being scared to share.
Now, it’s time to put an end to that.

Begin by creating your joy list
A Joy List is a list of objects that spark joy in you. The idea is to curate this list, and then use it to tap into your self-expression. You’ll use your objects to master the tool of object writing. This is where you take an object and write about it using your seven senses. These senses are seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, feeling and moving. Object writing is a powerful tool by itself. But by using your joy list, you get a double-workout. You practise your writing skills and harness your joy.

My challenge to you: spend five days writing for joy
Why five days? Because five days feels joyful. It’s long enough to feel like a daily practice and short enough to commit to–even amidst our daily pressures and strains. Especially so, in fact. When there are too many demands on your time, your needs, wants, likes and desires can get ignored. Your inner voice can diminish daily, little-by-little. That’s why you need to write. It’s a quiet protest, a quiet power.

How to create your joy list
Now, this is simple – so don’t overthink it. Simply go through your house or apartment and collect the objects that spark joy within you. Start by choosing just five. Don’t simply choose ones that are fashionable, or expensive, or desirable to others. Choose the ones that mean something to you, even if they’re rusty, old and in need of some love. You’ll give them that through your object writing. This ‘spark joy’ process has been made popular by Marie Kondo, the famous face of the Japanese art of tidying up. You don’t have to tidy-up, you just need to feel, and trust your instincts.

To help inspire you, here is one of my joy lists (meaning that the list you create doesn’t have to be THE definitive one)

  1. Wedding picture
  2. Hard copy of the December 2017 issue of British Vogue
  3. ‘Woody’ piggy bank
  4. Miranda perfume from French perfumery, Fragonard
  5. Our turquoise sofa

So, what exactly is object writing?

Object writing was invented by Pat Pattison (a Professor at Berklee College of Music) to help songwriters get raw material for their songs. It’s likely that some of your favourite songwriters and recording artists rocked up to the studio one day and followed the steps that I’ll outline below. But this technique isn’t just for songwriters–it can completely transform anyone’s writing skills.

Object writing can:

  • Get you started (it kicks your writing muscles into gear)
  • Bring your writing to life
  • Increase your powers of description
  • Improve your ability to give quick stories, examples and analogies
  • Build your confidence to tackle more difficult pieces of writing

It’s easy to master, fun and gives fast results. When we do it in my workshops people often want more. They want to re-experience the freedom they felt while writing from the heart–not the mind.

How to do it

Take an object from your Joy List and write about it–with a pen and a piece of paper–using only your seven senses. So, you look at the object and focus on what you see, hear, touch, taste and smell, the movement of the object and how you feel about it. You do this in a short burst of either 10 minutes, five minutes or 90 seconds. Having a limited amount of time makes you laser-focused and stops your mind from jabbering and getting in the way.

It helps to think more about the seven senses before you get started. I’m sure you’re all familiar with the first five senses, but it can take a little extra practice to describe objects in terms of feeling and movement. Think about feeling as being more than your emotions. For example, does an object (or your associations with it) make your heart beat faster or your muscles tense up? When it comes to movement, don’t just think of the obvious movement an object makes. Instead, also think about your internal movement when interacting with an object. Think about the strange sensation when getting back on solid land after a boat trip. Is your body moving in response to the object?

Object writing in seven steps:

  1. Write the following headings at the top of the page to remind you of the senses you need to focus on: 
    See • Hear • Touch • Taste • Smell • Feel • Move
  2. Set a stopwatch for 10 minutes, 5 minutes or 90 seconds.
  3. Spontaneously write down whatever comes to mind about the object. Write with excitement and interest. Be as specific as possible with your descriptions and images.
  4. You don’t need to stay completely focused on the object, so don’t worry if random words and sentences tumble out. Just go wherever your seven senses lead you.
  5. Write in full sentences if you can, but don’t worry if it’s easier not to.
  6. Keep your hand moving across the page and don’t stop to cross out words or correct spelling mistakes.
  7. Only amend spellings, grammar errors or other mistakes when you’ve finished. Yep, this is hard. But resist the temptation to stop and judge. Keep your flow and don’t worry if what you write looks clunky or disorganised.

Here’s an example of a 10-minute object writing session on a bottle of perfume (Miranda by Fragonard)
Disclaimer: I wrote this freehand while in Starbucks one evening but did a few minor edits while typing it up (to make it publication ready!)

Cool, silver, stainless steel containing such rich warmth and beauty. Burnt oak, sandalwood and cedar with the heady smell of freedom and summer days. The glug of champagne and flowers and life – a life on the precipice of earth, and air, and water, and rain. I hear the beat of bees, of rivers flowing and pulsing. So warm and inviting, enveloping me in a chocolate kiss. Beaconing to me like freshly baked cookies, warm with promise and crumbly with pleasure. And the stink, stink, stink of heady summer bliss.
The bottle feels cool and fresh to the touch. The juxtaposition of cold with the delicious drops inside. Each one like a bubble of soap that contains the whole rainbow in one drop. Knowing that I can be a different person when I step into this scent. One who eats croissants, no, not eats but nibbles them between delicate blood-red lips. And drinks red wine and coffee in the cafés of Paris, and cuddles by the fire in winter. While the noses are at work in the factory churning out scents of such pure delight.
The taste of vanilla, not ordinary, not normal, but rich and succulent on the tongue. I feel warm and bright, and earthy. I feel like I can plant my feet firmly on the ground and spin my mind to new dimensions like a kaleidoscope, or a maze in a secret garden. Like the key to the door of another world.
The bottle is a burgeoning promise, of a summer on the edge of reason when I didn’t know what to feel or think. When I had been betrayed.
Seeing the golden liquid slosh in a container that doesn’t belie its beauty, I see that truth and beauty isn’t always on show. That tin of temptation, makes me feel alive whenever I spray it. I am intoxicated and drunk with delight. I feel enlivened and bold as I carry around a secret. Like going to the cinema in the afternoon and seeing a film just for me. Like taking a bubble bath and spritzing on perfume just for me. For my ears and eyes only. I feel untouchable and touchable all at once and endorsed by love, and by happiness. By me and Fragonard and the secrets of my scent.

My challenge to you: spend five days writing for joy

Why five days? Because five days feels joyful. It’s long enough to feel like a daily practice and short enough to commit to – even amidst our daily pressures and strains. Especially so, in fact. When there are too many demands on your time, your needs, wants, likes and desires can get ignored. Your inner voice can diminish daily, little-by-little. That’s why you need to write. It’s a quiet protest, a quiet power.

If you liked this extract, you’ll love Heart, Sass & Soul: Journal Your Way to Inspiration and Happiness. It’s full of writing exercises, tips, techniques and food for thought to inspire you to fully express yourself in writing, and in life.


Greta Solomon is a British journalist turned writing coach and the author of two books about writing. Her latest book is Heart, Sass & Soul: Journal Your Way to Inspiration and Happiness. In 2006, she discovered a talent for helping people overcome the blocks, fears and shame that stops them from fully expressing themselves. Through talks, workshops and online programs, she teaches real-world writing techniques and inspires others to live rich, full lives. Her work has been featured in Forbes.com, Writers Digest, Kindred Spirit and The Numinous. She is a published poet and songwriter, a psychology graduate, certified life coach, trained lifelong learning teacher and holds a specialist certificate in lyric writing from Berklee College of Music. She lives in London with her husband and their daughter. Visit www.gretasolomon.com to find out more.

2019 Bay Area Writer’s Contest

WNBA logo

Join our writing contest for awards and cash prizes!

The Women’s National Book Association is a 100+ year old venerated organization of women and men across the broad spectrum of writing and publishing. Our membership includes Editors, Publishers, Literary Agents, Professors, Academics, Librarians, Authors, Book Marketers and many others involved in the world of books. We honor and celebrate woman authors and diverse writers and hope to include YOU with our 2019 Bay Area WNBA Writer’s Contest, launching June 1st and running through October 31st, 2019. 

Genres include: Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry.

Fiction and Nonfiction should be 500-2500 words. Poetry should be no more than 40 lines. 

Fees are: WNBA members $14.00 per submission, non-members $20.00 per submission. Participants may submit up to 3 pieces but must pay a separate fee for each submission.

We prefer unpublished work, though we do accept stand-alone excerpts from works seeking a publisher or agent. We accept simultaneous submissions, but if you are published elsewhere, please notify us immediately.

PRIZES: First Place earns $200; Second Place earns $100; Third Place earns $50.  Winners also get publication on the San Francisco WNBA website for 90 days. After 90 days the rights revert to the author, though if you publish it elsewhere please identify WNBA as the original publisher. If we publish your work, the rights still belong to you, though we ask you not to resubmit until 90 days after it appears on WNBA-SF and give us credit if it is published elsewhere.

You own the copyright. If we publish your work, the rights still belong to you, though we ask you not to resubmit until 90 days after it appears on Writer Advice and give us credit if it is published elsewhere.

Click here to enter your work…

Judges:

Amy Agigian, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Sociology at Suffolk University, where she directs the Center for Women’s Health and Human Rights. Trained in the sociology of women, gender, sexuality and health, she is pursuing her feminist dreams with a big project: Our Bodies Ourselves Today. She is the author of Baby Steps: How Lesbian Artificial Insemination is Changing the World as well as articles, book reviews, talks, and encyclopedia entries. Still a Californian at heart, Amy lives in Massachusetts with her partner and their sweet, towering son. 

Alice K Boatwright Alice K. Boatwright is the author of Collateral Damage (Standing Stone Books, 2012); Under an English Heaven (Cozy Cat Press, 2014); What Child Is This? (Cozy Cat Press, 2017); and Sea, Sky, Islands (Noontime Books, 2019), as well as stories published in journals such as CALYX, Parentheses, and Stone Canoe. She was awarded the bronze medal for literary fiction from the Independent Publisher Book Awards in 2013 and won the 2016 Mystery and Mayhem Grand Prize for best mystery. She holds an M.F.A. from Columbia and has taught writing at the University of New Hampshire, UC Berkeley Extension, and the American School of Paris.

 

Cheryl DumesnilCheryl Dumesnil is a poet, memoirist, editor, and writing coach. Her books include two poetry collections, Showtime at the Ministry of Lost Causes and In Praise of Falling; a memoir, Love Song for Baby X; and the anthologies We Got This: Solo Mom Stories of Grit, Heart, and Humor and Dorothy Parker’s Elbow: Tattoos on Writers, Writers on Tattoos. To learn more about her work, visit cheryldumesnil.com.

 

 

Rebecca Fish Ewan is a poet/cartoonist/founder of Plankton Press. Her hybrid-form work appears in After the Art, Brevity, Crab Fat, Hip Mama, Mutha, Not Very Quiet, TNB, Punctuate & Under the Gum Tree. At Arizona State University, where she earned her MFA in creative writing, she teaches landscape design with focus on hybrid-form storytelling, human/nature connections and place-based writing. She is the Books with Pictures columnist for DIY MFA and book reviewer for Split Rock Review. Hybrid chapbook and zines: Water Marks and Tiny Joys. CNF books: A Land Between and her new cartoon/poetry memoir By the Forces of Gravity. www.rebeccafishewan.com

 

Eva Hagberg Fisher

 

B. Lynn Goodwin is an author, editor, teacher, and manuscript coach who owns Writer Advice, www.writeradvice.com. She’s written Never Too Late: From Wannabe to Wife at 62, which won National Indie Excellence, Human Relations Indie Book, and Pinnacle Book Awards as well as a couple Honorable Mentions. Talent won a bronze medal from Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards, was a finalist for a Sarton Women’s Book Award and was short listed for the Literary Lightbox Award. You Want Me to Do WHAT? Journaling for Caregivers is still used by caregivers. Shorter works appeared in Hip Mama, The Sun, Good Housekeeping.com, Purple Clover.com, Flashquake and elsewhere.

 

Kate Farrell Kate Farrell storyteller, author, librarian, founded the Word Weaving Storytelling Project and published numerous educational materials on storytelling. She has contributed to and edited award-winning anthologies of personal narrative: Wisdom Has a Voice: Every Daughter’s Memories of Mother; co-edited Times They Were A-Changing: Women Remember the ’60s &’70s; co-edited Cry of the Nightbird: Writers Against Domestic Violence. She recently published a YA novella, Strange Beauty, and is currently writing a how-to guide for adults, Story Power: How the Art of Storytelling Can Change Your Life, Work, Relationships, and Legacy. Farrell is Past President of Women’s National Book Association, SF Chapter.

 

Sybil LockhartSybil Lockhart, PhD is a caregiver, parent, workshop leader, scientist, and editor. She is co-creator of literarymama.com, and creator of the Street Words 7 Questions Project. Her memoir, Mother in the Middle: A Biologist’s Story of Caring for Parent and Child (Touchstone/Simon & Schuster), tells a deeply personal story through a neuroscientific lens.

 

 

Erika LutzEricka Lutz’s eight books include the novel The Edge of Maybe, and her fiction and creative non-fiction is widely anthologized. She’s currently completing a memoir/cookbook, podcasts at Licking the Bowl, and provides book mentoring to writers and organizations (erickalutz.com). She lives in the Secret Undisclosed Location deep in the forests of the Sierra Nevada foothills where she raises chickens and manages her local farmers markets.

 

 

Bev ScottBev Scott had long desired to explore the whispered story about my grandfather. As my thirty-eight-year organization consulting career wound down, at the top of my list of goals and aspirations not yet pursued was to uncover these family secrets. After genealogy research did not reveal the full story, I concluded the story needed to be told as fiction using the facts as I knew them for a framework. Sarah’s Secret: A Western Tale of Betrayal and Forgiveness is the result. My previous work focused on non-fiction including Consulting on the Inside. I blog at “The Writing Life” on www.bevscott.com.

 

 

Annie StenzelAnnie Stenzel was born in Illinois, but has lived on both coasts of the U.S. and on other continents at various times in her life. Her book-length collection is The First Home Air After Absence, Big Table Publishing, released in 2017. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in print and online journals in the U.S. and the U.K., from Ambit to Willawaw Journal with stops at Allegro, Catamaran, Eclectica, Gargoyle, Kestrel, The Lake, and Whale Road, among others. She lives within sight of the San Francisco Bay. For more, visit www.anniestenzel.com.

 

So You Want to Be An Author: Panel at East West Bookshop

East West Bookshop
324 Castro St, Mountain View, CA

Monday, June 3, 2019  7:00pm

Have you wanted to write a book, but you don’t know how to begin? Or maybe you’re writing one now, but you don’t know what to do when it’s finished. Is the manuscript complete, and you’re wondering how to market it for sale? In the fast-changing world of e-book and printed book publishing, there’s a lot you need to know. And we have it for you. Join our panel of publishing industry experts, all members of WNBA-SF, moderated by board member and author Sue Wilhite for a lively and illuminating discussion about writing, publishing and marketing your book.

Moderator: After spending 20 years in programming and database design, Sue Wilhite knew she needed to catch up and develop her right brain. She is now a best-selling author, publisher, Law of Attraction coach, and sound healer, and is known as the “Profit Attraction Mentor.” Sue specializes in getting her clients unstuck and encouraging them to fulfill their own destinies. SweetSoundOfSuccess.com

 

Distinguished panelists:

Brenda Knight

Brenda Knight, author of Women of the Beat Generation, will read new work and a tribute to “Beat Goddess” ruth weiss. Brenda began her publishing career at HarperCollins. An author of ten books, she won the American Book Award for “Women of the Beat Generation.”  In 2015, she was named Indiefab Publisher of the Year. She is Editorial Director at Mango Publishing and is President of WNBA-SF Chapter.

 

 

Michael Larsen

Michael Larsen co-founded Larsen-Pomada Literary Agents in 1972. Over four decades, the agency sold hundreds of books to more than 100 publishers and imprints. The agency has stopped accepting new writers, but Mike loves helping all writers. He gives talks about writing and publishing, and does author coaching. He wrote How to Write a Book Proposal and How to Get a Literary Agent, and coauthored Guerrilla Marketing for Writers. Mike is co-director of the San Francisco Writers Conference and the San Francisco Writing for Change Conference.  larsenauthorcoaching.com/

Nina Amir, the Inspiration to Creation Coach, is an 14-times Amazon bestselling author of How to Blog a Book, The Author Training Manual, Creative Visualization for Writers, and a host of ebooks. As an Author Coach and one of 700 elite Certified High Performance Coaches world-wide—the only one working with writers—she helps her clients Achieve More Inspired Results. Nina founded the Nonfiction Writers’ University and the Write Nonfiction in November Challenge. She helps her clients get from the lightbulb moment to the realization of their dreams (without letting anything get in the way) and make a positive and meaningful difference with their words. www.ninaamir.com

 

 

Northern California Book Awards 2019

Northern California Book Awards logo

38th Northern California Book Awards
Sunday, June 23, 2019, 1:00- 3:30 pm

KORET AUDITORIUM • SAN FRANCISCO MAIN LIBRARY
100 Larkin Street, Civic Center, San Francisco
FREE ADMISSION

The 38th Annual Northern California Book Awards will celebrate writers and readers in Northern California. Awards in Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Translation, and Children’s Literature will be presented, with brief celebratory readings and remarks by the winning authors. Master of Ceremonies will be Oscar Villalon, ZYZZYVA Managing Editor

A lively reception with book signing follows, all free and open to the public. The Fred Cody Lifetime Achievement Award and NCBR Recognition Award will be presented. NCBAs are presented by Northern California Book Reviewers, a volunteer association of book reviewers and book review editors, Poetry Flash, the San Francisco Public Library and the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, the Women’s National Book Association-SF Chapter, PEN West, and the Mechanics’ Institute Library

Nominees and honorees will be announced in May 2019. Visit Poetryflash.org (see front page NCBA feature) for the list of last year’s nominees and winners.

Eligible reviewers and readers are always welcome. More information on this page.

Productivity Hacks for Authors

Better than Caffeine: Healthy Habits for High Energy Writing

Manage your energy for maximum productivity with tools and tricks from author/yoga teachers and holistic lifestyle experts, and WNBA-SF members Saeeda Hafiz, Elise Marie Collins, and Patti Breitman.

Friday, May 31, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

 

Location:
Mechanics’ Institute
4th Floor Meeting Room
57 Post Street
San Francisco, CA  94104

To register in advance for this FREE event, and for more information, click here!

If physical pain, fatigue, depression, discouragement or lack of focus have ever affected your writing, you need this workshop. Yoga, meditation, and a healing diet can help writers balance energy, inspiration and productivity. As writers we are expected to wear many hats, sometimes balancing day jobs with writing on the side. Authors must go from introvert to extrovert at the drop of a hat and be ready for interviews and public speaking, after spending months of solitary hours at the computer. The simple tools you will learn in this workshop will help you to be more alert, alive and inspired. You will notice the difference in your writing, creative process and focus.

Panelists will discuss how to ease into a healthy lifestyle, the impact of healing foods, exercise and sleep on writing. Learn tips and practices for energy and resilience from three authors who live, teach and write about yoga and health practices for modern times.

 

 

 

 

To register in advance for this FREE event, and for more information, click here!

Bridging: A One-Day Writing Retreat

with Keynote Speaker Elizabeth Rosner

Hedgebrook and the SMC MFA in Creative Writing program at Saint Mary’s College are collaborating to offer a one-day writing retreat for woman-identified, non-binary and genderqueer writers.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

9:00 am – 9:00 pm 

Location:
Saint Mary’s College of California
1928 Saint Mary’s Road
Moraga, CA 94575

Cost includes:

  • Food (three meals, happy hour, and evening cake and coffee)
    Vegan and gluten-free options available
  • Networking opportunities with Bay Area women writers’ groups
  • An evening keynote by Elizabeth Rosner, author of the novels The Speed of LightElectric City and Blue Nude, poetry collection, Gravity and nonfiction book, SURVIVOR CAFÉ: The Legacy of Trauma and the Labyrinth of Memory 
  • Your choice of two out of four afternoon workshops 

Funds raised from the retreat benefit Hedgebrook and the newly established Hedgebrook scholarship for a St. Mary’s MFA student.

For more information, please visit their event page. 

Our very own Brenda Knight will be on the publishing panel in the afternoon!

 

 

WNBA-SF National Poetry Month Reading and Mixer

The Beat Museum
540 Broadway, San Francisco, CA 94133

Sunday, April 28, 2019

3 pm: Poetry readings for about 90 minutes, and celebration with noshes and beverages afterward to 6 pm.

Celebrate National Poetry Month with the Women’s National Book Association Bay Area chapter in the heart of North Beach with some of the finest female writers around. Wild Women Poets will gather at the landmark venue, The Beat Museum in San Francisco.  Grab your bongos and wear your beret to what will be one of literary events of the year! This will also be a mixer with food, sparkling beverages and wine. Bring a friend and be ready for an evening filled with poetry, song, wine and a love of literature.

Brenda Knight

Moderator: Brenda Knight, author of Women of the Beat Generation, will read new work and a tribute to “Beat Goddess” ruth weiss. Brenda began her publishing career at HarperCollins. An author of ten books, she won the American Book Award for “Women of the Beat Generation.”  In 2015, she was named Indiefab Publisher of the Year. She is Editorial Director at Mango Publishing and is President of WNBA-SF Chapter.

 

Readers will include:

Claire Scott is an award winning poet who has received multiple Pushcart Prize nominations. Her work has been accepted by the Atlanta Review, Bellevue Literary Review, New Ohio Review, Enizagam and Healing Muse among others. Claire is the author of Waiting to be Called and Until I Couldn’t. She is the co-author of Unfolding in Light: A Sisters’ Journey in Photography and Poetry.

 

Diane Frank is an award-winning poet and author of seven books of poems including Canon of Bears and Ponderosa Pines. Blackberries in the Dream House, her first novel won the Chelson Award  for Fiction and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, Diane lives in San Francisco where she dances, plays cello and create her life as an art form. She teaches Poetry, Fiction and Memoir workshops at San Francisco State University and Dominican University.

 

Sheryl J. Bize-Boutte is an Oakland writer of prose and poetry, having written three books and a contributor to several anthologies. Her latest book, Running For The 2:10, delves deeper into her coming of age in the Bay Area and reviewed as  “A great contribution to literature.”

 

 

Kate FarrellKate Farrell founded the Word Weaving Storytelling Project, in collaboration with the California State Department of Education funded by grants from Zellerbach Family Fund, San Francisco, to train educators at all levels, and published numerous educational materials.  Farrell edited the anthology, Wisdom Has a Voice: Every Daughter’s Memories of Mother  She is co-editor of the anthology, Times They Were A-Changing: Women Remember the ’60s & 70s, 2013—Finalist for Foreword Reviews 2014 Book of the Year Award and 2014 Indie Excellence Award. Farrell is co-editor for the anthology, Cry of the Nightbird: Writers Against Domestic Violence, 2014–Finalist for the 2015 Next Generation Indie Book Award and the 2015 Indie Excellence Award.

 

Jeanne PowellDr. Jeanne Powell received degrees from WSU in Detroit and USF in San Francisco. She writes and performs poetry, flash fiction, nonfiction and short plays. Much of her work has been published. Since 1996, her small press has published 20 poets. She teaches English, writing and social studies to youth and adults. Her cultural and film reviews appear at wattpad.com [worddoctor], starkinsider.com, and sidewalkstv.com. Regent Press published CAROUSEL.

 

Beatrice Bowles in her own words:

I tell stories about secrets that nature keeps. 
A spy in Spider Grandmother’s tattered web,
I weave words into gardens and rus
t into silk.

Jennifer Griffith is currently finishing her first book, a mother-daughter memoir, and is launching her podcast in May 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

Writing When It Hurts

4 Perspectives to Make the Process Easier

by Sara B. Hart

How do you write about a difficult thing you’re going through?  And why would anyone want to do that anyway? When I was going through a major downsizing of my home last year, I found I longed to write about it as it was happening.  I thought it might help me get through the stickiest parts. And at some point I decided I wanted to make the writing pubic because I thought it might help others going through the same thing.  The result was my book “The Upside of Downsizing: Getting to Enough.” All of this has happened, and it is gratifying, but it wasn’t always easy. Here are the 4 things I found most difficult, and how I dealt with them:

Some of the feelings involved extremely personal things.  

For example I realized that some of the fear I was feeling was very similar to the fear I felt while I was going through treatment for a life-threatening illness.  Did I really want to make that previous experience public? I had decided I wanted the book to be as authentic as possible, so I did include that experience, but with a broad description and few specific facts.

Did I really want to live through the current experience again by describing it?  

Some of my downsizing moments were painful enough without having to do it all over again. Although I anticipated these difficult writing moments, I actually found that writing about them helped make them less painful.  To my surprise what was painful was reading the description again after the writing was completed.

How could I write about those times and not offend someone if they read what I’d written? 

A few of the things I wanted to write about involved other people who were doing and saying things that were definitely not helpful, and in some cases were hurtful.  Again, I leaned toward authenticity while choosing my words carefully. I also said over and over how cranky I was during this time, trying to blunt the impact of my words by taking responsibility for how I was feeling and behaving at the time.  That said, I discovered later that at least one person was offended. I think you just need to know that may happen if you want an honest description of what you were going through.

Often there were so many difficult things going on at the same time, I wondered what I should write about.  

As many of us often do, I just sat down and started writing, and found that what most needed to be said, came out.  This worked for me. You will have your own way, but as a writing teacher often says to us when we feel overwhelmed or stuck, “What CAN you do?”  And that would be my suggestion to you for those times when you’re feeling overwhelmed with feelings and just don’t know where to start.

Writing about difficult things as you’re going through them can be hard.  It also can be therapeutic and liberating and helpful to others who may be experiencing similar situations.  A crucial decision up front is, “How honest do I want to be?” The answer to that will guide much of what you say and how you say it.


About Sara B. Hart

“How will I know when I have enough?”  That is the question Sara Hart asks audiences when talking about her special project called Sign of Enough.  She began her project in the mid 1990’s, and recently her passion has been refueled as the results of our over consumption and greed become more and more obvious.  The idea also became the watch word for her as she completed a major downsizing of her home.  Sara focuses on the emotional side of this process in her book The Upside of Downsizing: Getting to Enough. See her website www.signofenough.com  for more information.

Dr. Hart has been involved in helping to develop leaders and effective teams inside organizations for 30+ years.  Prior to founding her own management consulting company, Hartcom, Sara was in charge of Training and Development for the research division of Pfizer both in the US and the UK.  She has facilitated hundreds of groups and presented to scores of meetings.  Sara loves to go on bike rides, walks, and to attend concerts, opera, theatre, and especially to have dinner with friends.  She lives with her cat, Mr. Bu, in Los Altos, CA.