The WNBA-SF Has Your Back!

Join or Renew Membership for Awesome Benefits!

Agents have told us that writers who belong to organizations like WNBA are more attractive because they demonstrate a commitment to the literary community. So if you’re a writer trying to get published, joining WNBA-SF Chapter makes you more attractive to agents!
If you’re not a writer, but a lover of the written word, joining WNBA makes you more interesting because you become part of a community of amazing women who are writers, editors, agents, publishers, booksellers, librarians, publicists, bloggers and more!
As a member of WNBA-SF Chapter, you can meet some of your favorite authors and get to know women who are on the cusp of being published and will soon join that list of your favorites! You’ll have interesting discussions about beautiful writing, share the challenges of finding an agent, learn about the current state of publishing and get tips on how to promote a self-published book, or how to pick the right read for a book club.
Joining WNBA-SF Chapter really does make you more attractive and interesting! 

NOW is the time to join (or renew if you are already a member) so that you can take advantage of these great benefits:

  • Meet publishing professionals face to face at WNBA mixers, readings, writers’ conferences, educational events and at our successful Pitch-O-Rama where many local authors met agents that led to publishing contracts!
  • Promote your book or business: For $30/year a published author or publishing professional member can have two book covers or logos on the WNBA/National home page and link to their business blog and website.
  • If you use @WNBA National, the national organization will often favor or re-tweet your tweets, increasing your following.
  • As WNBA member, you are eligible to submit an article for consideration in the Bookwoman – the national newsletter that goes to all 11 chapters and every member. And you can list your recent news in Member News.
  • Link your blog or website to the SF chapter. Attend as many in person meetings and events as possible to get to know people. Then there’s a good chance that you will make some really great connections.
  • Having WNBA on your resume is a plus, as it has helped many women move their careers forward, and agents like to see that you are part of the local literary community.
  • Discounts on WNBA events and opportunities to participate as a volunteer at the San Francisco Writers’ Conference and San Francisco Writing For Change and showcase your book at local book festivals and bookstores.
  • Ability to promote and sell your book or expertise at specified events.
  • Teach a class or present your book at one of our Mechanics Institute Library San Francisco events in 2019 for fantastic visibility to the public and the large MIL membership!
  • Participate in our or Litquake readings or book fairs.
  • Great way to network!!!!

You can join or renew now by going to this page. There is no application requirement to join. Become a member or renew your membership to enjoy the benefits for the whole year. Jump on your computer and sign up today.

Pitch-O-Rama 2019

PITCH-O-RAMA 2019!

Saturday, March 23, 2019
8:00 am – 12:30 pm 

Women’s Building Auditorium,
in the heart of the Mission 

3543 18th Street 
(between Guerrero & Valencia)
San Francisco CA 94110 
Includes a continental breakfast and pre-pitch coaching.

$65 WNBA members,  $75 Non-members, Men Welcome!
Limited to the first 60 ticketed attendees.

Pitch-O-Rama delivers the 4 Ps that lead to publication.

POLISH. You’ve polished your manuscript. Now polish your pitch with our pre-pitch coaches

PITCH. We’ve assembled top agents and publishers for all genres

PROMOTE. Power up with social media 

PARTICIPATE in a Q&A Panel. Secrets to Successful Book Marketing

= PUBLICATION

Pitch-O-Rama 
CLICK HERE FOR THE LIST OF AGENTS AND PUBLISHERS!!!

CLICK HERE FOR TIPS AND RULES FOR PITCHING!

Program
8 to 9 am: Continental Breakfast

8 to 9 am: Pre-Pitch Practice Sessions (3 coaches)

9 to 11:45: Pitch to Agents & Editors (2 one-hour sessions)

12 to 12:30 pm: Secrets to Successful Book Marketing for Writers

Pre-registration required, space limited to the first 60 ticketed attendees.

WNBA-SF Pitch-O-Rama: Meet the Agents & Editors, March 23, 2019

You will be sent a copy of this form. This will be your ticket to the event. Please print it and bring it with you. Thank you!
  • Select method of payment: Credit, Paypal ONLY
  • Directions for paying with Credit, Debit, or Paypal: YOU MUST ENTER A QUANTITY NUMBER, SUCH AS 1.
  • Price: $65.00 Quantity:
    Includes Continental Breakfast and early morning coaching on how to pitch, one-on-one pitch session, plus a panel discussion.
  • Price: $75.00 Quantity:
    Includes Continental Breakfast and early morning coaching on how to pitch, one-on-one pitch session, plus a panel discussion.
    Includes Continental Breakfast and early morning coaching on how to pitch, one-on-one pitch session, plus a panel discussion.
  • PAY ONLINE WITH CREDIT CARD OR PAYPAL as of March 26th.
  • Please email webmaster@wnba-sfchapter.org if you are having any issues with this form. Thank you!

WNBA-SF Holiday Showcase-Book Passage Corte Madera

Sunday, December 16
4:00-6:00 PM
Book Passage Corte Madera
51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 94925
FREE and Open to the Public

Light refreshments and wine tasting, books available for sale and book signing.
Please join us for a celebration of 50 years of women in the world of books with member authors of the San Francisco Chapter of the WNBA.
Before women had the right to vote, the Women’s National Book Association was advocating for women writers, booksellers, editors and “women in the world of books,” starting in 1917. This vital part of the Northern California publishing community includes New York Times bestselling authors, writing coaches, award-winning editors, literary agents, National Book Critics, book to film creatives, librarians, and an Indiefab Publisher of the Year, offering insider secrets to getting your book published.
In this 50th year Showcase, authors from the WNBA-SF will read from their books and join in a panel discussion of how women’s voices and those of diversity are more important than ever before. Q&A to follow.

Current List of Participating WNBA-SF Chapter Member Authors:

Kathleen Archambeau, Pride & Joy: LGBTQ Icons and Everyday Heroes
Sheryl Bize, Running for the 2:10
Megan Clancy, The Burden of a Daughter; A Novel
Kim Collins, F is For Feminist
Elise Marie Collins, Super Agers
Lynn Dow, Nightingale Tales: Stories from My Life as a Nurse
Diane Frank, Letters from a Sacred Mountain Place
B. Lynn Goodwin, Never Too Late, From Wannabe to Wife at 62
Joan Gelfand, You Can Be A Winning Writer
Brenda Knight, The Grateful Table
Mary Mackey, The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams: New and Selected Poems 1974 to 2018
Sharon McElhone, Basta: Anthology Dedicated to Helping Immigrant Women
Duncan McVean, My Patients Like Treats: Tales from a House Call Veterinarian
Gina L. Mulligan, From Across the Room
Barbara Ridley, When It’s Over
Marcia Rosen, The Senior Sleuths: Dead in Bed
Rebecca Rosenberg, The Secret Life of Mrs. London
Jan Schmuckler, Role Montage
Bev Scott, Sarah’s Secret: A Western Tale of Betrayal and Forgiveness
Renate Stendhal, Kiss Me Again, Paris
Michelle Travis, My Mom Has Two Jobs
Sue Wilhite, 21 Templates that Run Your World

Meet the WNBA-SF at the First-Ever Lit Crawl Book Fair

LitquakeSaturday, October 20, 2018
12:30 – 4 PM
The Chapel
777 Valencia Street, San Francisco
We are so excited to be a part of this landmark literary event and with local presses, businesses, and literary magazines for a book fair like no other, in the heart of the Mission District on the afternoon of Lit Crawl San Francisco, the world’s largest pop-up literary event of its kind. Don’t miss this opportunity to join the fun with Women’s National Association Board execs will be womaning the booth and selling member author books at the most book-loving city in the world! Over 10,000 people who attend Lit Crawl each year!
Entertainment: Live instrumental music will play throughout, with breaks for raffle drawings. Food and drink will be available for purchase from the venue. Participants who donate prizes will receive special shout-outs during the drawings.

Featured Member Interview – Michelle Travis

Interview by Susan Allison

When asked about her love of law, Michelle elaborates, “Since high school, I’ve never been able to resist an intense courtroom drama. I admire the art of a brilliant cross-examination, the elegance of a cleverly worded legal argument, and the craft of a piercing dissenting opinion. I also love how lawyers use the law to advance social justice. I headed to law school in search of my own set of practical tools for addressing workplace discrimination and social inequality. I wanted to study women’s equality more deeply, and learn how the law could better support working-women in particular.””

Michelle is a law professor who writes children’s books, and this might seem an unusual mix. Michelle explains, “Writing a children’s book is definitely not part of the job description of a lawyer or a law professor. But it turns out that lawyers are expert word-smiths and vivid storytellers. I latched onto the idea of writing a children’s book about working moms at the end of my two maternity leaves when I found myself dealing with conflicting emotions. I felt guilty about leaving my two young daughters with someone else, but I was also looking forward to teaching future attorneys as a law professor.

“I found myself struggling to figure out how to help my kids understand what it means to be a working mom. I searched for children’s books that could help us talk about my return to work, books that would encourage my daughters to be proud of the work that I do outside our home, and that would help them connect my mommy identity with my professional identity.

“I was frustrated to discover that most children’s books about working moms seemed to assume that kids must be sad and lonely while their moms are at work, so they offered various ways for kids to cope until their moms returned home each day. That was not exactly the message I was looking for (and it didn’t do much to allay my guilt). So I decided to write my own children’s book to fill the void. I wanted my book to celebrate diverse working moms doing a wide range of jobs. And I wanted my book to show how the work that women do as moms is connected to the work that we do outside the home—that we care for our kids and our societies with the same love, dedication, and commitment.

“On each page of MY MOM HAS TWO JOBS, children proudly describe how their moms care for them in a very special way, while also making the world better through their careers. The book highlights moms in a wide range of professions, including a teacher, engineer, police officer, doctor, secretary, dentist, firefighter, nurse, lawyer, waitress, military sergeant, veterinarian, and pilot.”

Support for working women and their children.

“I hope that My Mom Has Two Jobs will give all working moms a much-needed platform to talk with their kids about their own careers in a celebratory way. I hope the book will help children understand how their moms can do important work outside their homes, while still being loving, caring, and dedicated moms. I want the book to encourage kids to be proud of the work their moms do and to fuel their curiosity about their moms’ careers. I also hope that the book will help reinforce the message that women can do every possible kind of job, and that it might inspire young girls to imagine themselves in exciting careers as well.”

As a first-time author, Michelle speaks frankly about the publishing process: “For me, writing a children’s book was the easy part, but the unknown path of navigating the publishing world kept me from moving forward on this project for years. As it turns out, the publication process was less daunting than I had assumed. As a first-time children’s book author, my first step was to get a copy of The Children’s Writer’s and Illustrator’s Market. I sent my book manuscript to several small publishers that specialize in children’s literature, and I was thrilled to get a contract with Splashing Cow Books, which has since teamed up with a terrific distributor called DartFrog Books. DartFrog Books is a wonderful new avenue for authors from small publishing houses, as well as select self-published authors, to get their books onto the shelves of independent bookstores around the country.”

“Now that I’m working on an adult nonfiction book, Dads for Daughters, I’ve found the WNBA’s support and resources to be invaluable. I’ve also found it incredibly informative—and inspiring—to attend writers conferences to learn about the publishing process. As a researcher at heart, I’ve really appreciated books for newcomers like me, including Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents, and Jody Rein and Michael Larsen’s How to Write a Book Proposal.”

Michelle talks about why she’s chosen to write her next book, Dads for Daughters. “In looking beyond legal solutions for advancing women’s equality, I found myself thinking in two different directions. The first was to find ways to disrupt gender stereotypes about women’s roles before they take hold—which is what lead me to write My Mom Has Two Jobs. The second was to find ways to engage more men in the gender equality fight that inspired the new book project.

Inspiring Men to become Advocates

Dads for Daughters shares the stories of fathers who have been inspired by their daughters to become women’s rights advocates, and it launches a call to action for other dads of daughters to join the fight. It covers a wide range of arenas where work still needs to be done to achieve women’s equality, including in leadership positions, STEM jobs, government roles, sports opportunities, and equal pay. The book also offers dads of daughters concrete advice and resources to help become active supporters of women’s rights. This book will share encouraging research about the important role that dads of daughters can play in the women’s rights movement. Research has found that fathers of daughters—particularly dads with adult daughters who are working moms—have greater empathy for the challenges that working moms face, and they tend to be more outspoken advocates and supporters of women’s equality. CEOs who are dads of daughters, for example, have a smaller gender pay gap in their companies than in firms run by other men.”

Michelle Travis has taken on an important mission, and her books will continue to enlighten and galvanize men and women. She concludes with these inspiring words, “As someone who has entered the book publishing world as an unlikely latecomer, I would encourage everyone who has secretly harbored the idea of writing a book—particularly a children’s book—to dive headfirst into the process. Although the process has at times been daunting, I’ve learned not to take myself too seriously and not to hesitate to ask questions (to which my publisher will certainly attest). The joy of checking off ‘publish a children’s book’ from my ‘someday list’ has been well worth the journey. My daughters are now twelve and ten—well beyond their picture-book years—but they have enthusiastically supported me. My two proudest moments have been when my daughters asked me to sign their copies of the book and texted their friends to announce its publication. They definitely know a labor of love when they see it.”

WNBA member Michelle Travis is a law professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law. She is an expert on employment discrimination law and serves as the Co-Director of USF’s Labor and Employment Law Program. Michelle grew up in Colorado and now lives in the Bay Area with her husband, two daughters, and pet chinchilla. She is a former collegiate gymnast, a novice ballerina and an avid non-fiction reader. She is the author of My Mom Has Two Jobs, and is working on a new book titled Dads for Daughters.

Structure: The Secret Weapon to Help You Achieve Your Goals

By Nita Sweeney

I’d been running for five and a half hours through the rural countryside surrounding Xenia, Ohio. My tired legs were intermittently cramping and the bottoms of my feet ached. I’d run out of catchy songs to sing to myself and all the mantras I’d been chanting sounded stale. The trees lining the rails to trails which had looked beautiful earlier that morning closed in. I thought I might suffocate. I was right on schedule, twenty-three miles into my third full marathon. “I really want this to be over,” I thought. “But I still have to get back to the car.”

My next thought made me laugh, “This is just like writing!”

Throwing in the towel would be a relief – for a while. In this marathon, I could easily stop at the next water station and ask the EMTs to haul me back to town. With writing, I could start fresh on a new, more interesting, more marketable writing project. That’s what I’ve done with every other book I’ve begun.

While I’m still looking for the right publisher for my recently re-titled memoir, Depression Hates a Moving Target: How Running with My Dog Brought Me Back from the Brink, I have some great prospects and the book placed as a semi-finalist and finalist in two contests. Even if traditional publishing doesn’t pan out, I can self-publish. This process is exhausting, but also exciting – just like the final miles of a very long race. It’s no time to quit even though I’m really really tired and everything hurts.

So, I remembered what I know how to do: continue. Just now. Just here. This moment. Feel your feet (even if they hurt). Do one thing and then the next. Right foot. Left foot. Just keep going.

But how does someone who continues to have depressive episodes so crippling they make it difficult to get out of bed some days achieve her goals?

Structure!

In running, I found a training plan and followed it. I joined a group. I took a running class. I signed up for a race. I logged miles using online tools. I told everyone I knew. And, I ran.

With writing, the following similar structures work for me:

1) Classes and Workshops.
In my case, a writing instructor suggested I enter every contest that fit my book. As a result, my book is on the short-list for a big award. Other students might offer helpful suggestions as well. In either case, these people help you do what might not occur to you, what might seem too difficult, or what you might think is a waste of time and money.

2) A deadline.
The final days of a contest or publisher’s reading period is often enough to spark me into action. It’s that pressure cooker effect. There’s no time for perfectionism. I just have to get it done.

3) Tracking Tools.
I love querytracker.net and Submittable. Real numbers don’t lie. I can see my submissions and percentages. The geeky part of me loves this. Plus, Submittable recognizes people who collect the most rejections in a month. Anything like that helps.

4) Accountability Partners.
I tell a friend I’m going to do something. I tell my little writing group. I tell my husband or my neighbor. I tell the regulars at the coffee shop where I write. Eventually, one of them will ask about my goal. I don’t want to let either of us down.

5) Online Groups.
These are a different breed of accountability partners. But be careful with this. Choose wisely. I’m in a secret Facebook group for artists collecting rejection letters. If I’m not entering, I have no rejections to report. Telling these kind strangers is oddly satisfying.

But here’s the true secret. At some point, these external structures become internal. They light a fire inside me and I’m surprised to find myself motivated to attempt things I would never have done before. Magic? Perhaps. But I’ll take it.

After all, I finished that marathon in Xenia and I will publish this book. You have my promise.

What is your marathon? What kind of structure do you need to meet your goal? What will help you not give up? I’d love to hear about it. I want to cheer you to the finish.

Nita Sweeney’s articles and essays have appeared in magazines, journals, and books including Buddhist America, Dog World, Dog Fancy, Writer’s Journal, Country Living, Pitkin Review and in several newspapers and newsletters. She writes the blog, BumGlue and publishes a monthly e-newsletter, Write Now Newsletter, which features a short essay, a schedule of the classes she teaches, and a list of central Ohio writing events. Her forth-coming memoir, Depression Hates a Moving Target: How Running with My Dog Brought Me Back from the Brink, was short-listed for the 2018 William Faulkner – William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition Award. She was recently interviewed for the radio show and podcast Word Carver. When she’s not writing, Nita is running and racing. She has run three full marathons, twenty-six half marathons (in eighteen states), and more than sixty shorter races. Nita lives in central Ohio with her husband and biggest fan, Ed, and her future running partner, the yellow Labrador puppy, Scarlet (aka #ninetyninepercentgooddog).

How to Make Book Signing Events More Engaging

By Bridgitte Jackson-Buckley, author of The Gift of Crisis​ (October 2018)

A few weeks ago there was a book signing event I was incredibly excited to attend. The author recently published a beautifully illustrated informational book, and it was on social media the author would be on book tour at local bookstore. Happily, I put the date of the signing on my calendar, told the kids about it, and decided on my outfit beforehand. Again, I was totally excited to go!

The day of the event, I made preparations to arrive early. My normal modus operandi is to arrive 20 minutes before event start time, hoping I will get lucky with last minute parking and seating. Not this time. I made sure we left home with ample time to deal with L.A. traffic and L.A. parking.

When we arrived at the bookstore, it was packed! There were so many people standing around, looking for seats and buying the author’s book. There were women, men, and children of various ages and ethnicity, the bookstore owners, and friends and family of the author. It was so exciting! There was high energy, anticipation, and good chatter amongst those of us simply waiting to see her, the author.

The author sat in a corner of the bookstore behind the signing table, and watched patrons buy her book and fill seats. Once all the seats were taken, adults stood in corners and children squeezed in between chairs on the floor. When the bookstore owner walked out in front of the audience to introduce the author, you could have heard a pin drop. Silent anticipation filled the space. We were waiting for her. I was waiting for her. The bookstore owner eloquently introduced the author.

With my shoes off, one copy of her book on my lap, my son seated cross-legged on the floor and my daughter leaning against the wall, I watched her move to the front of the audience.

‘Speak! Tell us! Tell us! Give us the backstory! Tell us how you decided upon this creative project! What was your inspiration? Process? Moments of doubt? Unexpected creative surprises?! Speak!’ I thought.

And so it began!

The author stepped in front of the audience and we applauded. She was delighted to see so many diverse faces in support of the book. So were we! She read a few passages from the book (very nice!), took three questions (all that were asked), including one from me, did a sample drawing illustration of how she created the figures in the book, and…30 minutes later, that was it.

Wait.

What about everything else?

I wanted to know so much more about…I don’t know…whatever else I didn’t know!

It’s an incredible undertaking to write a book, to illustrate a book, to market a book and to sell a book. There was a lot of effort made and work put in, on her part, to bring this project to completion. As book readers, one can only imagine; as book authors, we know how much work is involved. I thought she would talk about something behind the scenes, or tell us something we would like to know but didn’t know we wanted to know. I thought it would be engaging, informative, and at minimum exciting.

However, it was… anti-climactic.

Let’s be clear. I’m not saying I went to the signing merely to be entertained. Seeing that most in attendance already purchased the book, the notion of selling the book at the event was redundant. Most people held 2–3 copies of the book! And the line for the cash register was still long.

I couldn’t help but wonder what else could have been done at the book signing in lieu of what is usually done.

With so many in attendance this was another opportunity to be creative and fun, and maybe do something unique. This was the type of signing I would imagine all authors want, an event filled with people who (mostly) all have bought your book! So why not celebrate with the audience? Why not just have fun with the audience since you’ve met the goal?

While I am not a marketing expert, or event planner, I thought perhaps some of the following could have made the event more engaging:

  1. An audience tally of their favorite chapter, scene, character, etc.
  2. Tips for brilliant social media marketing (This is how the author got the book deal!).
  3. A contest, or giveaway for the person who traveled the farthest distance to attend.
  4. Have audience members read a favorite passage in the book and tell why it’s their favorite.
  5. Select three members of the audience to tell their favorite “word of mouth” recommendation for your book. How do they describe your book to someone who has not read it?
  6. Spread the love. Talk about two of your favorite books (perhaps similar to your book) that audience members may not know about.

Despite my feeling that the event fell short, I have to say the author did not. She was gracious, kind and took the time to speak briefly with every single person who waited in line for her to sign the book. There was so much light in her eyes while she interacted with children and adults and thanked them for attending. There is nothing worse that meeting someone you admire and feel blown off by them. I can tell that each person who attended felt they were seen by author and given the gift of her time and attention.

It was apparent the audience, regardless of the perspective in which they attended the signing (as a book reader or fellow author) was excited for her, and for the book.

Bridgitte Jackson Buckley is a freelance writer, author and ghostwriter whose focus includes spirituality, transformational documentaries, and in-depth interviews. She is a former contributor to General Religion on the National circuit of Examiner.com as the National Spirituality Examiner. She’s interviewed many New Thought luminaries including Eckhart Tolle, Iyanla Vanzant, Deepak Chopra, and Elizabeth Gilbert. As a freelance writer, she has written online articles for Examiner, Tiny Buddha, Recreate Your Life Story, Thrive Global, Medium, Gaia and Patheos’ Spirituality Itself. She is a fluent Spanish speaker and has traveled extensively throughout Central America including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Additional travels also include Hong Kong, Malaysia and (her favorite adventure) Thailand. She currently resides in Los Angeles with her husband, three children and Miniature Schnauzer.

Featured Member Interview – Gina L. Mulligan

Interview by Susan Allison

When asked how and when she became a writer, Gina shares her history: “I began writing poetry as a child and thought I wanted to be a copywriter. So, I got my degree in Marketing and moved to New York City. My first job was as a flunky in an advertising agency. It was a great job, but I realized I didn’t like copywriting. The form was too short. That’s when I discovered a passion for fiction. I went back to school to study fiction and non-fiction writing. I worked as a freelance journalist while honing my novel writing skills. I’ve never found it difficult to shift between the two styles.”

Gina explains how she began writing historical fiction, a genre that still inspires her:The historical element to my writing was inspired by a trip to The Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego. It’s a beautiful Victorian hotel built in 1888. I wrote a story about it, and the story got longer. I realized how much I loved research and got immersed in the era. That was fifteen years ago, and I’m now working on my third historical novel.”

Gina has advice for other women writers, especially about publishing their work:

“As a new writer, it’s hard to understand how publishing can be anything but wonderful. Unlike the creative process, having a book published is all business. For me, the exciting part was getting my first big N.Y. literary agent. That’s a phone call I’ll never forget. It was such a huge weight lifted off my shoulders. For me, the most challenging piece came once my novel was finally released. It’s thrilling and terrifying to know strangers are reading your work, and because writers today have to help with marketing and promotion, it’s a lot of work. My suggestion to new writers is to find out what your publisher is willing to do for you. Will they pay for contest entry fees? Do they have salespeople to help with your book, or do they focus only on the known best-sellers? I also tell new writers not to submit anything to agents until it’s truly your best work. Once the book is published, it’s out there forever. Take the time to write something amazing!”

Asked how her own illness prompted her to found a non-profit and write a new book, Gina replies: “When I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009, I was working on my novel From Across The Room. It’s an epistolary novel, which means the story is told through letters. Even though I’d been researching and reading letters for five years, not until I was a patient and received snail mail did I recognize the power of letters. I received over 200 cards and letters, mostly from friends of friends, strangers. In this age of text messages and emails, we’ve forgetting the healing property of hand-written notes. They are tangible and so very expressive. My combined experience of writing an epistolary novel and receiving letters is the reason I started Girls Love Mail. I want others to be inspired and healed by the gift of a handwritten letter.”

Getting mail from all ages is most rewarding for me. Our youngest letter writers are second graders, and our oldest is a woman in her late 90’s. We’re keeping women engaged and helping to create the next generation of philanthropists. Truly anyone can perform a simple act of kindness.”

Gina shares how the process of writing Dear Friend evolved: “The Girls Love Mail gift book, Dear Friend, began organically. Because of my writing background, I recognized right away that we had content for a book. Some letter writers just have a knack for writing heartfelt or funny letters. So I began collecting letters in 2011. What I didn’t know is that it would take five years to collect enough for a book. This presented a challenge when I had to get signed release forms from every letter writer selected. Some writers sent one letter, five years earlier as part of a group, and I had to track them down by just a first name and last initial. It was fun. I felt like a super-sleuth. I couldn’t find them all, but the ones I found were so excited.”

Asked about her experience publishing Dear Friend, Gina offers, “Working with Chronicle Books is the best experience. Not only do I love how the book turned-out, they do, too. You can see and feel their care on every page. This book is even better than I ever imagined, and I love that we can reach so many more women with the healing power of words.”

Gina Mulligan is not done yet! “I’m working on my third historical novel. That’s about all I can say because it’s still so new. We’re also still collecting letters in case we do another book for the charity, and I’d love to see Dear Friend translated into other languages. We’re working on it.”

Gina L. Mulligan is a veteran freelance journalist and the author of two historical novels; REMEMBER THE LADIES and From Across The Room, and the non-fiction Dear Friend; Letters of Encouragement, Humor, and Love for Women with Breast Cancer. After her own diagnosis, Gina founded Girls Love Mail, a national charity that collects handwritten letters of for women with breast cancer. Since the formation in 2011, the charity has sent out over 140,000 letters across the country. Gina has been featured on The NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, The Steve Harvey Show, People.com, Today.com, and Woman’s Day Magazine. You can contact Gina at GinaLMullilgan.com and ginamulligan@girlslovemail.com.

Featured Member Interview – Elise Collins

Interview by Susan Allison

As a successful writer, Elise speaks of her history, explaining that she was encouraged by her family to be an intellectual, and was expected to read and write well. It was in her mid twenties that she began writing articles for newspapers and had a column called “Body and Soul” in the ​Psychic Reader​. She adds, “It was here where I explored the connection between the body and the spirit, and how that relationship in many forms is the foundation of health.” 

When asked if her passion for healthy living began in childhood, Elise responds, “Looking back, I was always attuned to a healthy lifestyle. My mom was into healthy foods; I read Wayne Dyer in high school and worked in a health food restaurant while in college. I grew up around my grandma and saw her live a very active life until the age of 95 when she passed away. My parents are 88 and 89 and they are both very active. I learned from all the older adults in my family that aging can be fun and exciting.”  

Elise says that the term “super ager” was a buzzword that resonated with her and she wanted to know how she could become one. Combining her knowledge and training in healing, yoga and Ayurveda, she decided to “put together something that helps people to age well and feel good about it.” This curiosity and desire spurred her to write  Super Ager, You Can Look Younger, Have More Energy, A Better Memory, and Live a Long and Healthy Life, released this summer. 

“I think people are confused about aging,” Elise explains. “The comment I get most from people who read my book is, ‘Oh, I didn’t realize aging could be fun or something to look forward to.’ I think we have so many limiting beliefs about aging. There is so much programming and people have not questioned their own beliefs around aging, which in my opinion seem to be stuck in the past. I think people are sooooo hungry for role models and examples of Super Agers. I think we are entering an era in which how ‘awake’ and conscious you are is more important than your age.” 

Elise offers advice about how to become a Super Ager:

1) Accept where you are right now at any age.

2) Know that it is never too late to change. You probably have some healthy habits and some not so healthy habits.  Some things that you want to try, but are perhaps afraid that you are too ‘old.’ What small step can you take today to become a little healthier, or is there something fun that you have wanted to try? Could it be a change in your attitude? Taking a walk? Doing some jumping jacks or eating more veggies? Acting? Dorothy Steel who starred as the elder in ​Black Panther​ didn’t start acting until she was 88 years old.  Start with one tiny, positive change and stick with that new habit until it is second nature. 

3) Remember your attitude is the most important part of Super Aging. And behind that is your purpose. What is your reason for living? What brings you joy? If you don’t know, then you probably won’t want to Super Age. 

So what brings Elise Collins joy in fulfilling her purpose?  “I love working with people of all ages and backgrounds. I really love young people and that is a trait of Super Agers. They like to keep up with what is new. That is me. I love the future! I love to work with groups in yoga classes and workshops and while coaching. People transform better in community. There is a group energy that you can’t get in one on one.” As a member and vice president of the WNBA, Elise enjoys being in a supportive community and inspiring women writers.

As an energetic Super Ager, Elise is enrolled in the University of Southern California, Masters of Gerontology Program, and says her next book will be on intergenerational yoga, ways to bring together children,  parents and grandparents. She adds, “We need more activities, besides eating and staring at screens that will bring multiple generations together.” 

Elise’s holistic view of aging will shift the way people think of themselves and the world. Potentially, it will keep anyone vibrant, energetic and sharp well into their 60’s, 80’s, 100’s and beyond, able to experience a profound life phase of meaning, wisdom and enjoyment. 

Elise Marie Collins has been a visionary yoga teacher for twenty years, inspiring students and clients to form healthy lifestyle patterns. She has also authored three books to encourage readers to optimize their well being and longevity, her latest being the life changing text, Super Ager: You Can Look Younger, Have More Energy, A Better Memory, and Live a Long and Healthy Life.  You can find more about her at EliseMarieCollins.com

Book Marketing Pros Panel: WNBA-SF’s Secrets to Successful Marketing for Writers

Author Lunch
Mechanics’ Institute Library, San Francisco
Friday, October 19, 2018, 12:00 Noon
57 Post Street, San Francisco, CA 94104
4th Floor, Chess Room (Free to Public, refreshments available)

When do you start marketing your book? Find out the surprising answer at WNBA-SF’s Book Marketing Master Class. Join three promotional and marketing experts who are there to give you highly effective bookselling tips and tools. Attendees can receive a proprietary marketing guide filled with the most up-to-date secrets to social media, and the art (and science) of selling your book. Building your platform and book promotion can sound daunting, even overwhelming. How can you do that and still have time for the creativity or writing? Turns out, marketing is a creative art as well. From achievable marketing plans, promo ideas that fit your book, and tips for ruling social media, this panel of experts will provide highly effective tools for marketing your writing, your book, and yourself. Brenda Knight will share insider secrets from big-house publishing to create preorders for your book, how to master metadata and much more. Top publicist Eileen Duhne will talk about which media actually sells books and the keys to booking print and radio including NP. Events Manager, TV host and public speaker extraordinaire Sue Wilhite will share how to craft highly successful talks. 

Eileen Duhné is a publicist and publishing consultant who has worked with everyone from New York Times bestselling authors to self-published books by first time authors. She knows what publicity actually sells books. Eileen has worked in or with the media since she began her career as a radio announcer in the SF Bay Area. The former Director of Publicity and Marketing at a book distributor in Northern CA, for 25 years she has worked on books from Quincy Jones, the creator of Aveda, the founder of The Shift Network, the SF Giants, award-winning photographers, and #1 New York Times bestselling author Mark Nepo, one of Oprah’s favorite writers, as well as dozens of books and projects by individual authors and indie publishers in both traditional and new publishing platforms. She specializes in mind/body/spirit, new sciences, and non-fiction titles.

Brenda KnightBrenda Knight began her career at HarperCollins, working with luminaries Marianne Williamson, Mark Nepo, Melody Beattie, Huston Smith and Paolo Coelho. Knight served for 8 years as publisher of Cleis Press & Viva Edition, winner of the IndieFab’s Publisher of the Year Award in 2014. Knight was recognized by the American Library Association for “Outstanding leadership and contribution to society through the publication of books of significance.” Knight is the author of Wild Women and Books, Be a Good in the World, and Women of the Beat Generation, which won an American Book Award. Currently, Knight is Director of Acquisitions and Editorial Development at Mango Publishing. She also serves as President of the Women’s National Book Association, San Francisco Chapter. Her blog can be found at lowerhaightholler.blogspot.com

Heart-centered entrepreneurs hire Sue Wilhite as their Profit Attraction Mentor so they can stop struggling with the marketing that’s not their genius, and attract more perfect customers. As a best-selling author, publisher and business coach, Sue teaches her clients how to earn six figures as an Authority – even if they can’t market their way out of a wet paper bag. Sue currently serves on the WNBA-SF Board as the Membership Co-Chair. ProfitAttractionFormula.com